THE WHALE STEWARDSHIP PROJECT a not-for-profit whale research, protection and education initiative.

Since 1998, the specialized programs of WSP have focused on research and protection of beluga whales found outside their normal range. We have documented several solitary, sociable belugas who have traveled far from their northern populations in the St. Lawrence River or the Arctic, into Eastern Canada and as far south as Boston Harbor in the United States. 

WSP is a member of the Maritime Marine Animal Response Network.

Whale Stewardship Project

P.O. Box 36101

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Canada   B3J 3S9

1-902-889-2679

Email: wsp@eastlink.ca

Working for a better world...

where whales and humans meet.

IF YOU SEE A BELUGA IN THE MARITIMES
1) REPORT your sighting: MARINE ANIMAL RESPONSE HOTLINE 1-866-567-6277.
2) CHECK WSP GUIDELINES (Click here) concerning solitary sociable beluga whales.
3) SHARE video and photos with WSP to contribute to the longest running lone beluga study in the world. Send to wsp@eastlink.ca

IF YOU SEE A BELUGA IN THE MARITIMES

1) REPORT your sighting: MARINE ANIMAL RESPONSE HOTLINE 1-866-567-6277.

2) CHECK WSP GUIDELINES (Click here) concerning solitary sociable beluga whales.

3) SHARE video and photos with WSP to contribute to the longest running lone beluga study in the world. Send to wsp@eastlink.ca

RESEARCH ~ PROTECTION ~ EDUCATION

This is a half hour educational video featuring "Wilma," our first solitary sociable beluga whale and the pioneering work of the Whale Stewardship Project.

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Meet The WhalesMeet_The_Whales.htmlMeet_The_Whales.htmlshapeimage_3_link_0
Humans & WhalesHumans_%26_Whales.htmlhttp://www.whalestewardship.org/Humans_%26_Whales.htmlHumans_%26_Whales.htmlshapeimage_4_link_0shapeimage_4_link_1
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Click here to play videohttps://vimeo.com/81960741

Recipient of three merit awards from the 2000 International Wildlife Film Festival in Missoula Montana for education and human wildlife interaction.

Photo by Levon Drover

SUMMER 2018

WSP Project Director Catherine Kinsman has identified one of the beluga whales in Ingonish Cape Breton as the same whale that was rescued on June 15th  2017 from the Nepisiguit River in northern NB. and
transported by plane back to his home in the St Lawrence River Estuary where he was released. A tag affixed to the beluga’s back transmitted satellite positions for 19 days after release. July 4th 2017 was the last time a signal was received from the Nepisiguit River beluga.
There was great concern for the young whale who’s health was failing while in the Nepisiguit River.
Though possible, no one knew for sure if he survived his ordeal until last week when Catherine was reviewing pictures and video of the two belugas in Ingonish. Catherine Kinsman said “As I looked at the video I had a feeling about the smaller gray whale... something about the look of his skin and the pattern of scars seemed familiar.”
Using her photographs and video taken during the rescue operation and doing some careful side by side comparisons Catherine was able to match several distinctive scars and conclude that this was in fact the same whale.

The Whale Stewardship Project is working closely with the community, other Marine Animal Response Network partners and DFO to develop and implement a program to protect the whales that is consistent with the new Marine Mammal regulations.
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Rescued beluga whale found alive and well one year later!